Electronic Medical Records: US Doctors 4%, NZ Doctors 60%

A recent NEJM study of US family doctors shows that just 4% are using Electronic Medical Records (EMR) systems fully (13% using a basic system). This compares to 60% of family doctors in New Zealand. (Update: The Commonwealth Fund survey gives a figure of 92% of NZ family doctors using EMR systems – it also gives a figure of 28% of US doctors).

Abstract

Background Electronic health records have the potential to improve the delivery of health care services. However, in the United States, physicians have been slow to adopt such systems. This study assessed physicians’ adoption of outpatient electronic health records, their satisfaction with such systems, the perceived effect of the systems on the quality of care, and the perceived barriers to adoption. Methods In late 2007 and early 2008, we conducted a national survey of 2758 physicians, which represented a response rate of 62%. Using a definition for electronic health records that was based on expert consensus, we determined the proportion of physicians who were using such records in an office setting and the relationship between adoption and the characteristics of individual physicians and their practices.

Results Four percent of physicians reported having an extensive, fully functional electronic-records system, and 13% reported having a basic system. In multivariate analyses, primary care physicians and those practicing in large groups, in hospitals or medical centers, and in the western region of the United States were more likely to use electronic health records. Physicians reported positive effects of these systems on several dimensions of quality of care and high levels of satisfaction. Financial barriers were viewed as having the greatest effect on decisions about the adoption of electronic health records.

Conclusions Physicians who use electronic health records believe such systems improve the quality of care and are generally satisfied with the systems. However, as of early 2008, electronic systems had been adopted by only a small minority of U.S. physicians, who may differ from later adopters of these systems.

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Published by

Dr Chris Paton

Dr Chris Paton is the Group Health for Global Health Informatics at the University of Oxford.

4 thoughts on “Electronic Medical Records: US Doctors 4%, NZ Doctors 60%”

  1. Electronic medical record storage is much more helpful than manual record storage. This is because the electronic storage methods are more organized, and can be accessed from anywhere in the world, provided a proper network connection.

  2. The most important benefit of obtaining medical records in particular is that this can allow you to receive more appropriate screening if it becomes necessary. And today electronic medical records are playing a major role.

  3. Electronic Medical Record (EMR) Software automates and simplifies the patient record documentation, storage and retrieval process. The EMR acts as the backbone for delivering immaculate patient care, establishing efficient processes and maximizing profitability.

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