2000 Members at the Health Informatics Discussion Forum!

Over on the Health Informatics Discussion Forum, we’ve hit over 2000 members. We also have loads of discussions, video and photo uploads and events on the site. Come and take a look:

http://www.healthinformaticsforum.com/

Research Job in Health Informatics, Sydney, Australia

The University of Sydney are recruiting for a post-doctoral Research Associate in Health Informatics:

The Faculty of Health Sciences is currently seeking a highly-organised and analytical Research Associate to independently develop research ideas in Health Informatics, as well as contribute to current research projects within the broader Health Informatics research group led by Prof Robert Steele. As Health Informatics is an international priority, this role will potentially provide an opportunity to network with leading researchers and develop a research profile both in Australia and overseas.

This role will require a PhD in Health Informatics, Health Information Systems, Computer Science, Information Systems or other related Health area. The PhD area of study will ideally have a strong health research approach, complemented with a strong information technology or computing aspect, or vice versa.

More information about this position can be found here: http://positions.usyd.edu.au/steam150955email

If you would like further assistance please don’t hesitate to contact Vanina Santana on +61 2 9561 9019 or v.santana@usyd.edu.au

US Health and Human Services Secretary Recognises Health IT Standards

From http://hitsp.wikispaces.com/

On Wednesday, the HHS Secretary has recognized the second set of Interoperability Specifications developed by HITSP, specifically Emergency Responder Electronic Health Record, Consumer Empowerment and Quality. The federal register notice announcing this is located at http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2009/pdf/E9-1068.pdf

Third annual Ali Abdulla Al-Ubaydli scholarships for mobile medical computing

Mo Al-Ubaydli has emailed to let me know about this year’s Ali Abdulla Al-Ubaydli scholarships:

Dr. Mohammad Al-Ubaydli and Epocrates are pleased to provide annual Ali Abdulla Al-Ubaydli scholarships for mobile medical computing. Every year we award $5000 of Ali Abdulla Al-Ubaydli™ Scholarships for Mobile Medical Computing™ to select and train the next generation of mobile medical computing researchers.

The challenge
At the end of 2008 there are over 1000 citations in PubMed™ that dealt with handheld computers. Many lessons have accumulated in the clinical literature but we need to understand and assimilate these lessons.

The challenge is to provide these lessons as peer-reviewed and unbiased summaries based on scientific fact, not marketing hype.

The Scholarships
Each year we select two scholars in the USA and offer other awards to applicants from around the world to review selected literature and make summary reports that will be published in the Mobile Medical Computing Reviews journal. The award winners will be mentored and trained by Dr. Mohammad Al-Ubaydli, author of six books, including “Handheld Computers for Doctors”.

The results
Once complete, the reviews will be published and freely available through the website of the new journal Mobile Medical Computing Reviews. Each scholar will be able to quote their own reviews in their list of publications.

Apply for a Scholarship

Medicine 2.0

The Medicine 2.0 Congress was held last week in Toronto, Canada. I attended on my way back from the AMEE 2008 conference in Prague.

My role was to chair the session on medical education on day 1 and to present 2 talks on day 2, one on mobile computing and one on online communities.

The event was a great opportunity to catch up with my health informatics colleagues and meet face-to-face with previously only online acquaintances.

Peter Murray gave an excellent keynote address, introducing the conference and some of the themes of Medicine 2.0 on behalf of the IMIA. Gunther Eysenbach followed with his welcome and an introduction to the concept of ‘Apomediation’. For those not in the know, you can read up on apomediation in his JMIR article introducing the concept.

The ‘Medical Bloggers’ panel consisted of Berci Mesko, Peter Murray, Jen McCabe Gorman, Keith Kaplan and Sam Solomon. The panel included some great presentations, and I found Sam’s tale of medical blogging gone wrong particularly interesting.

After lunch, I listened to Leanne Bowler talk about teen health sites and Margaret Hansen gave us an insight into the world of virtual reality medical education.

Next up was the session I chaired on Medical Education. We had a great presentation from Panos Bamidis, who talked about the use of Moodle and other e-learning technologies he uses on his Medical Informatics courses. Deidre Bonnycastle was a very enthusiastic advocate of e-learning tools and told us about the various technologies she had tried at the University of Saskatchewan. Berci Mesko gave a very interesting talk about protecting your online reputation and he also showed us some of the fascinating presentations he has attended in Second Life. Finally, Rod Ward livened up the crowd with an animated discussion about all aspects of the use of Web 2.0 technology in medical education.

The next day kicked off with talks from Judy Proudfoot, Caryl Barnes and Lisa Whitehead on the subject of Methodological Issues and Challenges in eHealth Research.

Next up was my session with Carol Bond, Shirley Fenton, myself and Ken Seto. We talked about various aspects of running online medical communities for education and developing professional connections.

After lunch I gave another presentation, this time on the role of mobile technology in medicine. My co-presenters for the session included Benjamin Hughes and Indra Joshi, who talked about the kinds of websites junior doctors used; Miguel Cabrer, who demonstrated the amazing MedTing platform; and Marcelino Cabrera Giraldez, who talked about how Web 2.0 can be used for patients with rare diseases.

The day rounded off with presentations from Joan Dzenowagis of the WHO and Kevin Clauson who gave a very entertaining and interactive session on the risks associated with Web 2.0.

For more coverage of the conference check out:

Peter Murray on the HI Krew:

Rod Ward on Informaticopia:

Berci Mesko on Scienceroll:

John Sharp on eHealth:

Neil Versel on the Healthcare IT Blog:

Kate Jongbloed on Unpacking Development:

Even more at: