Web 2.0 in Healthcare on NHS Resource Centre

Nice article about web 2.0 in healthcare on the NHS resource centre website:

If you thought the internet and email were amazing, you ain’t seen nothing yet. New Web 2.0 technologies are already being developed and having an impact on healthcare.

Nick Saalfeld sets out to find out what patients, doctors and policy makers are doing with collaborative and multi-media technologies.Internet technologies have changed the way almost everyone works. We can now communicate at lightning speed, work with peers on the other side of the world and find information at the click of a mouse.

http://www.microsoft.com/uk/nhs/content/articles/web-20-technologies-in-healthcare.aspx

Guest Post: Guidelines for use of Web 2.0 in depression

Hi All

My name is Susanne Doddrell and I am the Quality Coordinator for Lifeline Aotearoa.

We have a fantastic website at www.thelowdown.co.nz which provides info and support for young people in relation to Depression. We also operate a message board open to postings. In this forum we aim to foster and encourage an environment of hopefulness around depression, with information, questions, stories and support from service users and their peers.

What I am interested in is any research on best/good practice guidelines with reference to message board moderation in the area of mental health. Is this something that you can help with, or know of anything/anyone that I may be able to access to obtain this information. Our service is currently developing guidelines, and I am finding it difficult to locate literature specifically related to this.

If this is something that you are able to help with, or even direct me in the appropriate direction, it would be much appreciated.

Kind regards

Susanne Doddrell

Quality Coordinator

The Lowdown

Lifeline Aotearoa

Ph: (09) 909 9215 | Fax: (09) 909 9219 | Mobile: 027 498 7601

Email: Susanned@lifeline.org.nz

Upcoming Health Informatics Conferences

I’m attending a few Health Informatics conferences in the next couple of months. I’m planning on blogging the sessions and writing about interesting new developments in health informatics. Here are the conferences I’m going to:

1. Medicine 2.0 in Toronto. September 17-18. I’m going to be presenting about our new social networking site for encouraging collaboration between health innovators. More on this soon, but there’s some pretty exciting developments in the works. Chen Lou will also be presenting about our Facebook Influenza tracking project. This conference was great fun last year so I’m looking forward to attending again this year.

2. HINZ (Health Informatics New Zealand). September 30 – October 2. This is the annual Health Informatics conference for New Zealand. Again, I’ll be talking about our new health innovation networking site, but also representing the National Institute for Health Innovation at our stand and generally catching up with NZ health informatics people.

3. m-Health New Zealand. November 6. I’m organising this conference with Robyn Whittaker from the Clinical Trials Research Unit at Auckland University. We’ve got some great guest speakers and submissions are coming in. If you’d like to present at this conference, make sure you submit your abstract before the 14th of August.

4. AMIA 2009. November 14-18. This is going to be a huge event in San Fransisco and a great health informatics conference. I’m co-organising a tutorial about using social networking technology (including Second Life) in medical education with W Ed Hammond, Constance Johnson and Parvati Dev.

Tufts Summer Institute on Web Strategies for Health Communication

Lisa Neal Gualtieri, Ph.D has emailed to let me know about this interesting course Tuft’s is offering:

Enroll in the Tufts Summer Institute on Web Strategies for Health Communication, http://webstrategiesforhealth.com/, to learn how you can help healthcare organizations develop and implement Web strategies to drive the success of their online presence. Healthcare organizations are faced with an ever evolving choice of Web technologies that make it challenging to create a coherent and justifiable Web strategy. At the Tufts Summer Institute, you will learn how to select, use, manage, and evaluate the effectiveness of Web technologies for health communication.

Learn from Tufts faculty and distinguished guest speakers how to:
• Use the Web to communicate with and connect to patients.
• Develop a coherent and justifiable Web strategy for health communication.
• Select and manage Web 2.0 technologies to create a Web presence that provides a rich user experience.
• Accelerate your online presence through the use of social media sites and tools such as Facebook, twitter, ning, and WordPress.
• Employ research-based methodologies such as persona development and formative evaluation to increase the effectiveness and reduce the risk of Web development projects.
• Learn the best practices employed by leading health Web sites including WebMD.com, MayoClinic.com, CDC.gov, TuDiabetes.com, WeightWatchers.com, Livestrong.org, CureTogether.com, Roadback.org, and ABC News Health.
Web Strategies for Health Communication runs July 19-24, 2009. The course meets at the Tufts University School of Medicine campus in Boston from Sunday, July 19, from 5-8 p.m. and on Monday-Friday, July 20-24, from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. It is offered through the Health Communication Program at Tufts University School of Medicine.

Enroll in the Summer Institute at http://webstrategiesforhealth.com/. Registration costs $900 before June 19 and $1000 after.

University of Auckland in Second Life

Tour of the University of Auckland’s Second Life presence – “Long White Cloud” with Scott Diener. It’s a virtual medical centre with beds, ambulances, and simulation facilities:

Watch in HD at YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=au7_a9VLFb4

Blogosphere Debates Personalised Medicine

My morning read of Scienceroll highlighted a blogosphere debate regarding Sergey Brin’s recent blog posting about 23andMe.

The New York Times picked up on Sergey Brin’s new blog post. Unfortunately, according to Dr Steve Murphy, (aka The Gene Sherpa) they got some key facts wrong.

The New York Times:

Mr. Brin, who made the announcement on a blog, says he does not have the disease and that the exact implications of the discovery are not clear. Studies show that his likelihood of contracting Parkinson’s disease in his lifetime may be 20 percent to 80 percent, Mr. Brin said.

Dr Murphy:

Parkinson Disease affects approximately 1% of the population by age 65% and 4 to 5% by age 85 years. Therefore the lifetime risk is 2-5%. So a 1.2 to 2.1 Odds ratio would be 4% to 10% roughly. Not 80%!